Think, Read, Cook

Because no single way of eating works for everybody.

A Gorgeous Gooey Garlic Fix

Garlic01

Garlic is good for your health. Just search the Internet for “garlic” and “health” and you’ll see all kinds of information about it. And there are all kinds of ways to eat it, too.

A friend of mine invented this way to prepare garlic, and it’s more than just a tasty condiment to add to dishes – it’s a concentrated garlic fix on its own. It’s easy, it’s incredibly delicious, and of course it’s good for you. You can use it as an ingredient, or even as a delicious spread on bread, crackers, or with butter on baked potatoes… or just eat it by itself.

And without further explanation, here it is!

Gooey Good Garlic

1.  Start with quite a lot of garlic. It’s most convenient to buy the pre-peeled cloves at he grocery store so you don’t have to bother breaking up the cloves and cleaning the skins off.

2.  Put the cloves in an ovenproof container, then pour enough chicken stock over them to cover them. Put a slosh of vegetable oil in, or even two sloshes.

3.  Put the container into the oven, set it for 300 degrees for about 3 hours, or until they smell done. Check them from time to time in case they need more chicken stock.

4.  When they are done they will be dark brown, sticky and almost sweet.

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24 comments on “A Gorgeous Gooey Garlic Fix

  1. Kate O
    April 23, 2013

    There’s a cookbook I keep just for one section, wherein the author travels to Normandy, and learns to make a Really Proper aioli from Old Therese, who is also known as The Garlic Woman. That encounter elicits a pronouncement that has stayed with me (and proven quite true) in the years since:

    “”Never trust a man who doesn’t love garlic. He has no courage. No soul. He will disappoint you in every way,” the garlic woman told me darkly, as though from experience.”

    Thereafter follows a description of the ritual enacted by elderly Therese and her even more elderly sister Celeste, as they make a Really Proper aioli. “For the next hour, a loud discussion raged, hinging upon the slovenly habits of various local cooks who couldn’t make a decent mayonnaise, never mind the glorious garlic mayonnaise, their beloved aioli. Such people were everywhere and not to be trusted. Names were names, scandals raked up, reputations shredded. The two old girls fell around the room, cackling and gossiping… Between nips of cognac for their health, they pounded huge cloves of garlic in an ancient mortar, beating egg yolks with the pestle, while the fruity green olive oil dripped slowly from Celeste’s fingertips and old Therese, with her arthritic hands, kept on beating. There was one tense moment, when the aioli threatened to separate.

    “Slowly with the oil, Celeste! Lentement,” protested old Therese.
    “The oil? Mais non! You must BEAT faster,” screeched Celeste.

    And on from there. I realize that your post is NOT about aioli, but it just felt right that one panegyric to the glories of garlic deserved another. Add this (what you’ve just put down) to the list of things I am planning to try at my earliest convenience.

    • thinkreadcook
      April 23, 2013

      That’s lovely! Thanks, Kate; that really made me smile! 😀

    • MyMagicPill
      April 23, 2013

      I love the attention and the care previous generations gave to the food they consumed. The emphasis on freshness and quality of ingredients, the pride of producing a superb product, it was an art form performed in kitchens everywhere by unlikely artists, like Celeste and Therese seem to be. We would all be healthier with a return to it.

      • thinkreadcook
        April 24, 2013

        We’re lucky these days if we get some time to cook. I think people really need to *make* time to cook, not just for art’s sake, but for our health as well.

      • MyMagicPill
        April 24, 2013

        I agree with you. I used to think I had no time to cook and so I ate what was fast and resultingly what was unhealthy. I became morbidly obese. I decided to make time to cook (and go to the gym) and got healthy. One of the ways I save time for the days I really am too busy is making healthy meals and keeping them in my freezer – nothing is faster than reheating, not even a drive through!

      • thinkreadcook
        April 24, 2013

        Exactly! And I find that if I close my eyes and really make the effort to taste fast food, or frozen food from the grocery store, it’s just salt, sugar, and some unidentifiable thing that probably came out of a factory. I’d rather eat my own cooking any day!

  2. judy
    April 23, 2013

    I love garlic. What happens to the stock? Is the garlic like garlic jam?

    • thinkreadcook
      April 24, 2013

      Not sure about garlic jam. The stock can evaporate, but you don’t want to let it go away completely. It gets delicious!

  3. judy
    April 23, 2013

    I always thought aoli was a spagetti sauce! These two sound like to witches. Yr description of them really made me laugh. Would you give me the recipe? I’ve never made my own mayonnaise. Tku. Judy

  4. judy
    April 24, 2013

    So is the saucepan open or closec? Boil or simmer?

    • thinkreadcook
      April 24, 2013

      As per the recipe, it’s a baking dish, in the oven, with the temperature at 300°F. Not covered. 🙂

  5. judy
    April 24, 2013

    Sorry. No memory. Getting old.

  6. judy
    April 25, 2013

    Nah. Yr a youngster. My kitty’s doing better.

  7. judy
    April 25, 2013

    I cannot believe the numbers that say i will be 70 next year oh horror!

    • thinkreadcook
      April 25, 2013

      No matter how old I get, I always feel inside like I’m 22. More experienced and less dumb than when I really was 22 – and a trifle creakier – but still 22. 🙂

  8. judy
    April 25, 2013

    My children would say i behave like a yen yr old!!!! My head says late teens esrly 20’s. My crying bouts say – i don’t know. My body’s beginning to let me down
    Hey ho.

  9. judy
    April 26, 2013

    Tell that to my aged body. Wish you lived here. Bet you wouldn’t. Being silly. Ignore. Depression.

    • thinkreadcook
      April 26, 2013

      Don’t worry. I know all about depression, having struggled with it for upwards of 20 years. Hope you feel better soon.

  10. judy
    April 26, 2013

    Unfortunately mine started before i hit my teens. The whole family said oh well. Judy cries easily. I started treatment age 40.

    • thinkreadcook
      April 26, 2013

      Do you find it’s worse after you eat wheat products, like bread, pasta, crackers, etc.? That was most of the reason for mine.

  11. judy
    April 26, 2013

    No. I just wake up with a black cloud over me. Or i cry for no reason. I get upset easily. Very sensitive as my daughter says. I think it comes from something a teacher said to me when i was about 8 or 9 that had stayed with me for 60 yrs and won’t leave me. Stupid.

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