Think, Read, Cook

Because no single way of eating works for everybody.

In Honour of My Father: After the Ham

AfterTheHam

My dad was a ham freak.

Like his father before him, he would eat ham in pretty much any form. Baked ham, fried ham, ham sandwiches, ham omelettes, ham croquettes. And like him, I’m completely ham-addicted myself.

Dad baked a great ham. His favourite method was to make his own glaze – and I can’t give you the recipe for it, because it was different every time. But it always involved something sweet – like apricot or peach jam – and some hot mustard. Sometimes there were raisins too, or ginger, or cloves, or onions, or allspice, or maple syrup. He’d slice diamond shapes into the fat of the ham, and then paint the glaze on, so the flavour would soak into the meat. It was fantastic.

Of course, once you’ve baked a ham and had a dinner of it, you’ll likely have leftovers. A friend of mine says that “Eternity” can be defined as “two people and one ham”. There are many ways to use the rest of your ham – and this next recipe is one of them. My dad and his dad, would have loved it.

Is ham good for your health? Well, that depends on who you ask, and on how the ham was cured. But one thing is certain: buying a raw ham and baking it yourself gives you a much healthier and more delicious food than buying a package of wet, slimy, pre-formed ham-like meat product and trying to eat it. I can’t stand that stuff.  🙂

After your next ham dinner, use some of the leftovers to make this amazingly good ham spread. It comes to me through a friend of the family, who tells me it’s a recipe created by Julia Child. Ham freaks, unite!

 

Deviled Ham

Ingredients:

2 cups diced ham

2 Tablespoons mayonnaise

2 teaspoons dijon mustard

1 to 2 teaspoons horseradish

1 to 3 teaspoons grated onion

dash of lemon juice

pepper to taste

 

Method:

1.  Blend  ham in food processor until smooth.

2.  Add the rest of the ingredients and blend. Adjust seasonings to taste.

3.  Spread on crackers or toast, in sandwiches, or use as a dip for vegetables. Enjoy!

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11 comments on “In Honour of My Father: After the Ham

  1. argentumvulgaris
    September 4, 2013

    I reblogged this on Fizz, great story and ideas.

    AV

    • thinkreadcook
      September 4, 2013

      Thanks – I really appreciate that! And I like your blog very much, too. 🙂

      • argentumvulgaris
        September 4, 2013

        Cool, thanks, I see you have been visiting, appreciated.

        AV

  2. judy
    September 4, 2013

    When you say a raw ham is that where you get slices for sandwiches?

    • thinkreadcook
      September 4, 2013

      Raw ham is cured, but not cooked. The sliced ham for sandwiches is fully cooked, but often so over-processed that it ends up being an Unpleasant Experience. People shouldn’t eat raw ham – it’s not safe to eat. 🙂

      • argentumvulgaris
        September 4, 2013

        Better to cure a leg )or smaller portion) of pork, then cook it. I haven’t done that for years, you’ve given me the urge.

        AV

      • thinkreadcook
        September 4, 2013

        Any time you want to post your curing method, I’d be delighted to read it!

      • argentumvulgaris
        September 4, 2013

        Basically for curing rock salt (not iodised table salt) 20:1 sodium nitrite; soak for 8-10 days, wash in fresh cold water, cook off in slow oven or grill (240F) so the internal temp of the ham reaches 140-160F, need thermometer for meat. Done

        There are many recipes and variations on the net.

        If the leg is big, then you may inject curing agent above. Commercial curing agents like Prague Powder are also available.

        AV

      • thinkreadcook
        September 4, 2013

        Cool! Thanks so much for posting this. 🙂

      • argentumvulgaris
        September 4, 2013

        No problem, there’s no magic involved… 🙂

        AV

      • thinkreadcook
        September 4, 2013

        Didn’t think there was – but I’ve never attempted that particular bit of chemistry before! 🙂

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